Savannah's Squares - Blueprint of a Planned City

  " Monterey Square was laid out in 1847, long after Oglethorpe's arrival, but it's a picturesque, living example of James Oglethorpe's vision for America's first planned city." T.C. Michaels | Genteel & Bard Fine Savannah History Walking Tours | genteelandbard.com

Monterey Square perfectly captures General James Oglethorpe's vision for Savannah's planned wards and city layout. It's not only beautiful, but masterfully strategic too, the squares the perfect arrangement for troops to gather in segmented, but wide open spaces, where they could defend Savannah in case of an invasion. 

Oglethorpe's idea was for Savannah's original settlers was for city squares to function as common gathering places. On either side of the square, trust buildings were placed, comprised of public buildings and churches for the ward. On the North and South sides of each square - 10 equal sized homes. Behind them, another 10.

Even better, each household was entitled to about 5 acres of farm land on the edge of town for growing produce, with an option of an extra 45 acres farther out.

Not bad for Savannah's original residents in 1733, who were after-all, debtors and the poor sent from England with Oglethorpe.

 

Monterey Square was laid out in 1847, long after Oglethorpe's arrival, but it's a picturesque, living example of James Oglethorpe's vision for America's first planned city.

While in Monterey Square, visit the Mercer Williams House, best known from the book-turned-movie, Midnight In The Garden of Good & Evil. Also visit Revolutionary War hero, Casmir Pulaski's monument and the Congregation Mickve Israel Synagogue, which is the 3rd oldest Jewish Congregation in North America.