The Forgotten Slave Burial Ground 'Neath Calhoun Square

 "And if you think to remember, maybe that’s a monument of sorts. To be remembered. That’s stronger than stone, anyway." Brenna Lauren Michaels | Genteel & Bard Fine Savannah Walking History Tours | genteelandbard.com

Of all Savannah’s hidden locals, one of the most somber is the east end of Calhoun Square.

Savannah once played home to thousands of African American slaves. At the time - the place where Calhoun now sits buttressed on all sides by beautiful stately mansions and draped in the shade of moss-laden oak trees - all was overgrown wilds, just past the edge of town, where it was deemed that those seen as property could bury their dead.

And so many a trek was made, on tired feet, and with faces stained with tears. The ones who remained laid to rest loved ones who’d finally found restful freedom.

Time passed, the old slave cemetery was no longer needed, and as with most burial grounds here in Savannah, the old grounds were manicured, paved, and built over to make room for the beautiful city that continued to sprout like a garden beside the sea.

Imagine the faces, and hands. The prayers cried and the promises whispered over the earth where Calhoun Square now stands.

You can walk there, find a bench and sit a while.

And if you think to remember, maybe that’s a monument of sorts.

To be remembered. That’s stronger than stone, anyway.